The Helen Caldicott Foundation | Sunken Soviet Submarines Threaten Nuclear Catastrophe in Russia’s Arctic
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Sunken Soviet Submarines Threaten Nuclear Catastrophe in Russia’s Arctic

Sunken Soviet Submarines Threaten Nuclear Catastrophe in Russia’s Arctic

The decaying, condition of 3 nuclear submarines sunk in Russia’s arctic waters threatens that fragile region with nuclear catastrophe.

Matthew Bodner / The Moscow Times 13 November, 2014

From the article: “…while other nations abandoned the practice of dumping radioactive waste at sea, the Soviet Union continued to do so until its collapse in 1991, and did so in larger volumes than other nuclear powers.

Dr. Nils Bohmer, the managing director of the Bellona Foundation — a prominent Norwegian environmental NGO that works Arctic nuclear waste issues — explains this discrepancy by the fact that the Soviet navy experienced significantly more nuclear incidents than anyone else.

Some of the thousands of containers have already shown signs of leakage, according to Nilsen of the Barents Observer. But the threat posed by these small objects pales in comparison with the spent reactor fuel housed in the rusting carcasses of three Soviet-era nuclear submarines and a number of individual reactor compartments torn from their original vessels and dropped in the ocean.

“Counted in radioactivity, you could say that one single reactor compartment with spent nuclear fuel inside contains much more radioactivity than all the thousands of containers combined,” Nilsen said…”

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